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About Program

The focus of PIPS on internal security is reflected in its several periodic publications. A database on security maintained through extensive media monitoring and reports from correspondents in the field is the basis of weekly and monthly security reports that the Institute publishes. PIPS also brings out an annual security report at the end of each year. These reports are widely disseminated in Pakistan and abroad and not only include casualty figures in terrorist/militant attacks, but also analyse the perpetrators tactics and the security forces response. The reports highlight the challenges thrown up by internal insecurity and their implications for Pakistan, and the ways and means to achieve security not just for Pakistan, but also for the wider region and the world. Another important aspect of PIPS focus on internal security relates to internal conflicts. The Institute publishes weekly and monthly reports on the situation in active theatres of conflict in Pakistan. These periodic publications are: Karachi Watch, Balochistan Watch, and KP and FATA Conflict Monitor. The PIPS reports and analysis present in-depth analysis of the security landscape of the country, and of the factors of insecurity and violence and highlight strategic solutions to reduce the risk of insecurity and violence in the country.

Annual Security reports

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Research Papers/Reports
A review of National Internal Security Policy (2013-18)
Muhammad Amir Rana

Pakistan' s federal government announced the internal security policy 2013-18 on February 24, 2014. This was the first time that a political government announced its vision of internal security. The federal interior ministry had been assigned the task of formulating the new policy and came up with the first draft which was presented to the federal cabinet in December 2013. The cabinet suggested changes to address neglected issues. A revised draft was presented to the cabinet on February 24 this year. . Read More
Persecuting Pakistan’s minorities: state complicity or historic neglect?
Razeshta Sethna

The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are governed through the 1901 Frontier Crimes Regulation (FCR), which was enacted by the British to promote their own interests. This system was once lauded as a success and liked by the tribesmen. However, at present the system is widely seen as authoritarian both in its form and essence resulting in socioeconomic and sociopolitical stagnation of the area. It has engendered serious problems relating to governance, social change, human rights  Read More
FATA reforms: journey so far and the way forward
Asmatullah Khan Wazir

The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are governed through the 1901 Frontier Crimes Regulation (FCR), which was enacted by the British to promote their own interests. This system was once lauded as a success and liked by the tribesmen. However, at present the system is widely seen as authoritarian both in its form and essence resulting in socioeconomic and sociopolitical stagnation of the area. It has engendered serious problems relating to governance, social change, human rights and democratization. Read More
Militant economy of Karachi
Zia Ur Rehman

Karachi is Pakistan’s financial hub and its most populous city with an estimated population of 23.5 million as of April 2013 (Khan, 2012a). While Islamabad is the political capital, Karachi is the country’s foremost commercial and financial centre. It accounts for the lion’s share in Pakistan’s gross domestic product and generates at least 60 percent of national revenue. The city is also home to the central bank or State Bank of Pakistan, the Karachi Stock Exchange and head offices of national and multinational companies including  Read More

 
Pakistan Monthly Security Report
April 2015

A declining trend in the number of terrorist attacks in Pakistan that started in January 2015 continued in April, for the fourth month in a row. In April, 50 terrorist attacks took place in the country, 10 less from the previous month, which claimed 70 lives and inflicted injuries on another 89 people. Among those killed in terrorist attacks across Pakistan in

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Weekly Security Report (KP & FATA)
 April 15-21, 2015

A total of six terrorist attacks took place in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and FATA during the week under review, one more from the previous week. These attacks claimed five lives and injured a same number of people. Three of these attacks were reported from Charsadda and Lower Dir districts of KP killing four people and leaving one injured. Meanwhile, three reported attacks from FATA killed one and wounded another people.

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Balochistan watch
 April 2015

The number of terrorist attacks in Balochistan fell for second month in a row. Compared to 37 in February and 24 in March, as many as 14 terrorist attacks took place in the province during the month under review. However the number of people killed in terrorist attacks in Balochistan increased from 23 in March to 37 in April. Among these killed were 28

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Karachi watch
April 2015
A declining trend in sectarian violence continued in Karachi in April 2015. However the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and affiliated militants kept on targeting policemen and civilians. Also, in April two prominent figures including civil society activist Sabeen Mahmud and a Karachi university teacher Dr Waheedur Rahman were target killed in the city. ....
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Publications
 
Analysis

Pak Institute for Peace Studies brings out an annual security report at the end of each year, which is widely disseminated in Pakistan and abroad. Pakistan Security Report 2014 includes not only casualty figures in terrorist/militant attacks, but also analyses the perpetrators' tactics and the security forces' response. The report highlights the challenges thrown up by internal insecurity and their implications for Pakistan, and the ways and means to achieve security not just for Pakistan, but also for the wider region.
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Religious freedom is a human right. It is as critical to the development of a nation as its economy and security, given that it reflects moral values and a sense of identity. The right to religious freedom for all religious groups constitutes the freedom to practice without threats from those organizations and individuals rejecting the beliefs of minority religions and sects. Freedom of religion takes on greater importance when communities and diverse ethnic groups co-exist, especially in countries where intolerance and religious
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